2017马报彩图资料


生活垃圾分类要解决什么问题

  文章来源:网银在线官网|2017马报彩图资料2017马报彩图资料发布时间:2019-12-09 15:56:05  【字号:      】

  

  Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.

  ‘ARTISTS RESPOND: AMERICAN ART AND THE VIETNAM WAR, 1965-1975’ (through Aug. 18) and ‘TIFFANY CHUNG: VIETNAM, PAST IS PROLOGUE’ (through Sept. 2) at Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington. Everything in “Artists Respond,” a big, inspiriting blast of a historical survey, dates from a time when the United States was losing its soul, and its artists — some, anyway — were trying to save theirs by denouncing a racist war. Figures well known for their politically hard-hitting work — Judith Bernstein, Leon Golub, Hans Haacke, Peter Saul, Nancy Spero — are here in strength. But so are others, like Dan Flavin and Donald Judd and Barnett Newman, seldom associated with visual activism. Concurrent with the survey is a smaller, fine-tuned show by a contemporary Vietnamese-born artist, Tiffany Chung; it views the war through the eyes of people on the receiving end of aggression. (Holland Cotter) 202-663-7970, americanart.si.edu

  ‘AUSCHWITZ. NOT LONG AGO. NOT FAR AWAY’ at the Museum of Jewish Heritage (through Jan. 3). Killing as a communal business, made widely lucrative by the Third Reich, permeates this traveling exhibition about the largest German death camp, Auschwitz, whose yawning gatehouse, with its converging rail tracks, has become emblematic of the Holocaust. Well timed, during a worldwide surge of anti-Semitism, the harrowing installation strives, successfully, for fresh relevance. The exhibition illuminates the topography of evil, the deliberate designing of a hell on earth by fanatical racists and compliant architects and provisioners, while also highlighting the strenuous struggle for survival in a place where, as Primo Levi learned, “there is no why.” (Ralph Blumenthal) 646-437-4202, mjhnyc.org

  ‘MATTHEW BARNEY: REDOUBT’ at Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven (through June 16). The wildly innovative sculptor and filmmaker, Yale class of 1989, heads back to the halls of ivy to present his first major project since the six-hour excremental eruption of “River of Fundament.” The exhibition shows Barney in a lighter, nimbler mode than he has displayed in years. The new film “Redoubt,” shot in his home state of Idaho, riffs on the myth of Diana and Actaeon; the goddess, here, is an NRA-approved sharpshooter, while the doomed voyeur is the artist himself, making plein-air etchings of Diana and her attendants. Related copper etchings appear in the show, and Barney has electroplated them over varying times, encrusting them with weird metal nodules. “Redoubt” lacks the operatic grandeur some of Barney’s fanboys prefer. But it’s the most emancipated work of his career, and it should make a star of Eleanor Bauer, the dancer and choreographer whom he has entrusted with the film’s most beautiful movement sequences. The film runs about two hours and screens on Saturday afternoons and on select weekdays; check the website for times. (Jason Farago) 203-432-0600, artgallery.yale.edu

  ‘CAMP: NOTES ON FASHION’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Sept. 8). Inspired by Susan Sontag’s famous 1964 essay, “Notes on ‘Camp,’” the latest spectacular from the Met’s Costume Institute attempts to define this elastic, constantly evolving concept, which leaves taste, seriousness and heteronormativity in the dust. The show researches camp’s emergence in 18th-century France and 19th-century England, examines “Sontagian Camp” and culminates in an immense gallery of designer confectionaries from the 1980s to now that calls to mind a big, shiny Christmas tree barricaded with presents. (Roberta Smith) 212-535-7100, metmuseum.org

  ‘LEONARD COHEN: A CRACK IN EVERYTHING’ at the Jewish Museum (through Sept. 8). The curators of this show, John Zeppetelli of the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal and Victor Shiffman, commissioned artists of various disciplines to develop pieces inspired by Cohen. Some are simple and quiet, like “Ear on a Worm” from the film artist Tacita Dean, a small image playing on a loop high in the space that shows a perched bird, a reference to “Bird on the Wire” from Cohen’s 1969 album “Songs From a Room.” Some are closer to traditional documentary, like George Fok’s “Passing Through,” which intercuts performances by Cohen throughout his career with video that surrounds the viewer, suggesting the songs are constant and eternal while the performer’s body changes with time. Taken together, the layered work on display has a lot to offer on Cohen, but even more to say about how we respond to music, bring it into our lives, and use it as both a balm and an agent for transformation. (Mark Richardson) 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org

  ‘THE JIM HENSON EXHIBITION’ at the Museum of the Moving Image (ongoing). The rainbow connection has been established in Astoria, Queens, where this museum has opened a new permanent wing devoted to the career of America’s great puppeteer, who was born in Mississippi in 1936 and died, too young, in 1990. Henson began presenting the short TV program “Sam and Friends” before he was out of his teens; one of its characters, the soft-faced Kermit, was fashioned from his mother’s old coat and would not mature into a frog for more than a decade. The influence of early variety television, with its succession of skits and songs, runs through “Sesame Street” and “The Muppet Show,” though Henson also spent the late 1960s crafting peace-and-love documentaries and prototyping a psychedelic nightclub. Young visitors will delight in seeing Big Bird, Elmo, Miss Piggy and the Swedish Chef; adults can dig deep into sketches and storyboards and rediscover some old friends. (Farago) 718-784-0077, movingimage.us

  ‘LINCOLN KIRSTEIN’S MODERN’ at the Museum of Modern Art (through June 15). With George Balanchine, the indefatigable Kirstein (1907-96) founded the School of American Ballet and the New York City Ballet. But he was also an impassioned writer, collector, curator and devotee of photography who had much to do with MoMA in its early years. The museum commemorates his complex career with art, letters and ballet ephemera, drawn from its vast holdings. (Smith) 212-708-9400, moma.org

  ‘ALICJA KWADE: PARAPIVOT’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Oct. 27). This shrewd and scientifically inclined artist, born in Poland and based in Berlin, has delivered the best edition in five years of the Met’s hit-or-miss rooftop sculpture commission. Two tall armatures of interlocking steel rectangles, the taller of them rising more than 18 feet, support heavy orbs of different-colored marble; some of the balls perch precariously on the steel frames, while others, head-scratchingly, are squinched between them. Walk around these astral abstractions and the frames seem to become quotation marks for the transformed skyline of Midtown; the marbles might be planets, each just as precarious as the one from which they’ve been quarried. (Farago) 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

  ‘MAYBE MAYBE NOT: CHRISTOPHER WOOL AND THE HILL COLLECTION’ at the Hill Art Foundation (through June 28). This foundation’s inaugural show presents more than a dozen paintings, works on paper and photographs by Wool, the painter who wrenched abstraction into the No Wave era. In a stenciled painting from 1989, the drippy black letters of the word “SPOKESMAN” are arranged three by three, filling the white aluminum background with the same deductive logic as Frank Stella’s early stripes. After making layered, silk-screened floral patterns in the 1990s, Wool became more gestural; three extraordinary paintings here from the 2000s, with cloudy spray-gun loop-de-loops and merciless erasures, exhibit a simultaneous love and doubt of abstraction that recalls the best of Albert Oehlen. His enthrallingly difficult later silk screens cannibalize his own archive, discordantly remixing earlier works and treating paint as both material and information. (Farago) 212-337-4455, hillartfoundation.org

  ‘JOAN MIRÓ: BIRTH OF THE WORLD’ at the Museum of Modern Art (through June 15). Drawn mostly from MoMA’s unrivaled Miró collection, this fabulous exhibition is best when tracing the artist’s brilliant early twists on Modernism and their swift ascent to “The Birth of the World,” a 1927 masterpiece that presaged the drips and stains of radical painting two decades hence. Unappreciated in its time, it was barely exhibited until 1968. (Smith) 212-708-9400, moma.org

  [Read about the events that our other critics have chosen for the week ahead.]

  ‘PLAY IT LOUD: INSTRUMENTS OF ROCK & ROLL’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through Oct. 1). Presented in collaboration with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, this exhibition offers a vision of history in which the rock music that flowered in the 1960s and ’70s sits firmly at the center. The format of the rock band provides the structure of the show, with one room given over to the rhythm section and another showcasing “Guitar Gods.” Yet another room has a display highlighting the guitar’s destruction, with pieces of instruments trashed by Kurt Cobain and Pete Townshend. To the extent that it shifts focus toward the tools of the rock trade, the show is illuminating. Of particular interest is the room set aside for “Creating a Sound,” which focuses on the sonic possibility of electronics. The lighting in “Play It Loud” is dim, perhaps reflecting rock music as the sound of the night. Each individual instrument shines like a beacon, as if it’s catching the glint of an onstage spotlight. It makes the space between audience member and musician seem vast, but that doesn’t diminish the wonder of browsing the tools once used by pop royalty. (Richardson) 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

  ‘PUNK LUST: RAW PROVOCATION 1971-1985’ at the Museum of Sex (through Nov. 30). This show begins with imagery from the Velvet Underground: The 1963 paperback of that title, an exploration of what was then called deviant sexual behavior and gave the band its name, is one of the first objects on display. Working through photos, album art and fliers by artists like Iggy Pop, the New York Dolls, Patti Smith and, yes, the Sex Pistols, the exhibition demonstrates how punk offered a space for sexual expression outside the mainstream. In the story told by “Punk Lust,” much of it laid out in placards by the writer and musician Vivien Goldman, one of the show’s curators, graphic sexual imagery is a tool for shock that frightens away the straight world and offers comfort to those who remain inside. While some of the power dynamic is typical — underage groupies cavorting with rock stars — images from female, queer and nonbinary artists like Jayne County and the Slits make a strong case for sex as an essential source of punk liberation. (Richardson) 212-689-6337, museumofsex.com

  ‘SCENES FROM THE COLLECTION’ at the Jewish Museum (ongoing). After a surgical renovation to its grand pile on Fifth Avenue, the Jewish Museum has reopened its third-floor galleries with a rethought, refreshed display of its permanent collection, which intermingles 4,000 years of Judaica with modern and contemporary art by Jews and gentiles alike — Mark Rothko, Lee Krasner, Nan Goldin, Cindy Sherman and the excellent young Nigerian draftswoman Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze. The works are shown in a nimble, nonchronological suite of galleries, and some of its century-spanning juxtapositions are bracing; others feel reductive, even dilettantish. But always, the Jewish Museum conceives of art and religion as interlocking elements of a story of civilization, commendably open to new influences and new interpretations. (Farago) 212-423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org

  ‘THE SELF-PORTRAIT, FROM SCHIELE TO BECKMANN’ at the Neue Galerie (through June 24). Self-portraiture can seem pretty narrow. But the 70-odd works in this exhibition, which run from a handful of delightfully exact Rembrandt etchings to Felix Nussbaum’s searing 1940 painting “Self-Portrait in the Camp,” ably demonstrate the genre’s universal scope: It’s a consciously constructed illusion of spontaneous self-revelation, a sincere put-on. And as such it’s a peek beneath the hood of art in general. (Will Heinrich)212-994-9493, neuegalerie.org

  ‘TOO FAST TO LIVE, TOO YOUNG TO DIE: PUNK GRAPHICS, 1976-1986’ at the Museum of Arts and Design (through Aug. 18). Many of the objects on display in this exhibition were first hung in record stores or in the bedrooms of teenagers. Posters promoting new albums, tours and shows are mixed in with album art, zines, buttons and other miscellany. Most of the pieces are affixed to the walls with magnets and are not framed, and almost all show signs of wear. The presentation reinforces that this was commercial art meant for wide consumption, and the ragged edges and prominent creases in the works make the history feel alive. (Richardson)212-299-7777, madmuseum.org

  ‘T. REX: THE ULTIMATE PREDATOR’ at the American Museum of Natural History (through Aug. 9, 2020). Everyone’s favorite 18,000-pound prehistoric killer gets the star treatment in this eye-opening exhibition, which presents the latest scientific research on T. rex and also introduces many other tyrannosaurs, some discovered only this century in China and Mongolia. T. rex evolved mainly during the Cretaceous period to have keen eyes, spindly arms and massive conical teeth, which could bear down on prey with the force of a U-Haul truck; the dinosaur could even swallow whole bones, as affirmed here by a kid-friendly display of fossilized excrement. The show mixes 66-million-year-old teeth with the latest 3-D prints of dino bones, and also presents new models of T. rex as a baby, a juvenile and a full-grown annihilator. Turns out this most savage beast was covered with — believe it! — a soft coat of beige or white feathers. (Farago) 212-769-5100, amnh.org

  ‘2019 WHITNEY BIENNIAL’ at the Whitney Museum of American Art (through Sept. 22). Given the political tensions that have sent spasms through the nation over the past two years, you might have expected — hoped — that this year’s biennial would be one big, sharp Occupy-style yawp. It isn’t. Politics are present but, with a few notable exceptions, murmured, coded, stitched into the weave of fastidiously form-conscious, labor-intensive work. As a result, the exhibition, organized by two young Whitney curators, Rujeko Hockley and Jane Panetta, gives the initial impression of being a well-groomed group show rather than a statement of resistance. But once you start looking closely, the impression changes artist by artist, piece by piece — there’s quiet agitation in the air. (Cotter) 212-570-3600, whitney.org

  ‘JEFF WALL’ at Gagosian (through July 26). Rumination and risk-taking, in equal measure, mark this conceptual photographer’s spellbinding new exhibition. The show, Wall’s first at this Chelsea gallery since ending a 25-year run with the rival dealer Marian Goodman, feels decidedly introspective. Figures alone in contemplative trances, or alienated from their partners in scenes of evident tension, define most of the works. The encyclopedic visual literacy that has long characterized Wall’s pictures (with their compositional echoes of old master paintings) has been pared back, allowing more psychological complexity to emerge. Just as new is an emphasis on narrative and sequence; among the pieces are two diptychs and an enveloping, cinematic triptych. (Karen Rosenberg) 212-741-1717, gagosian.com

  ‘THE WORLD BETWEEN EMPIRES: ART AND IDENTITY IN THE ANCIENT MIDDLE EAST’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (through June 23). The Met excels at epic-scale archaeological exhibitions, and this is a prime example. It brings together work made between 100 B.C. and A.D. 250 in what we now know as Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Yemen. In the ancient world, all were in the sphere of two competing superpowers — Rome to the west and Parthia to the east — and though imperial influence was strong, it was far from all-determining. Each of the subject territories selectively grafted it onto local traditions to create distinctive new grass-roots cultural blends. Equally important, the show addresses the fate of art from the past in a politically fraught present. (Cotter) 212-535-7710, metmuseum.org

  ‘SIAH ARMAJANI: FOLLOW THIS LINE’ at the Met Breuer (through June 2). Born in Iran, Armajani has been living in the United States since 1960. This retrospective ranges from work he did as a teenage activist in Tehran to models of the many public sculptures he has produced across America over the past five decades. It introduces us to a sharp social thinker, a wry (and increasingly melancholic) metaphysician, a plain-style visual poet and, above all, an artist-ethicist. “Bridge Over Tree,” Armajani’s wonderful large-scale sculpture presented by Public Art Fund at Brooklyn Bridge Park (on the Empire Fulton Ferry Lawn through Sept. 29) to coincide with the Met show, is well timed for our present era of sundering moral confusion and offers ways forward from it. (Cotter) 212-731-1675, metmuseum.org

  ‘MORONI: THE RICHES OF RENAISSANCE PORTRAITURE’ at the Frick Collection (through June 2). Moroni, among the best of underappreciated Renaissance painters, brought a new level of naturalism to his subjects, who included lavishly dressed aristocrats but also scholars and tradesmen. (See his depiction of an extraordinarily handsome, sensitive and contemporary-looking tailor.) We seem to be looking at real people as they existed, unidealized, meticulously observed and psychologically present, especially in their direct, appraising gazes. A thrilling show. (Smith) 212-288-0700, frick.org

  ‘RADICALISM IN THE WILDERNESS: JAPANESE ARTISTS IN THE GLOBAL 1960S’ at Japan Society (through June 9). This sturdy addition to our story of the global 1960s, organized by the respected art historian Reiko Tomii, introduces American audiences to three bold positions in Japanese art — by one solo figure and two collectives who all worked far from the lights of Tokyo. Yutaka Matsuzawa, a Conceptualist with a Buddhist streak working in a forest near Nagano, made posters and mail art that aimed to imagine a world of total nothingness. The group GUN, in agrarian Niigata, produced breathtaking land art by filling pesticide sprayers with pigment and spewing color across fresh snow. And the Play, a collective in the Kansai region, sailed together on barges or built tree houses on hillsides to rediscover freedoms beyond social boundaries. The lesson: It’s not just the opposition of East and West that needs rethinking, but that of the metropolis and the sticks. (Farago) 212-715-1258, japansociety.org

B:

  

  2017马报彩图资料【前】【两】【个】【条】【款】【执】【行】【后】《【深】【夜】【画】【廊】》【的】【总】【股】【数】【回】【到】940【万】【股】,【华】【云】【基】【金】【占】【有】【其】【中】【的】570【万】【股】【的】【投】【票】【权】。【他】【们】【这】【个】【算】【盘】【在】【房】【诗】【菱】【看】【来】【相】【当】【于】【以】【入】【股】【增】【资】750【万】【为】【对】【价】,【获】【得】《【深】【夜】【画】【廊】》【矩】【阵】【两】【年】【的】【经】【营】【权】。【两】【年】【内】【赚】【到】【的】【钱】,【按】【股】【份】【分】【配】【给】【股】【东】,【但】【是】【房】【诗】【菱】【那】【份】【得】【分】【给】【华】【云】【一】【半】。 【这】【个】【方】【案】【算】【是】【仁】【者】【见】【仁】,【房】【诗】

【就】【是】【这】【样】【的】【眼】【神】,【让】【苏】【红】【打】【了】【个】【寒】【战】,【反】【而】【清】【醒】【过】【来】【了】。【睁】【开】【眼】,【抬】【头】【望】【去】,【那】【男】【人】【也】【看】【着】【自】【己】,【眼】【中】【藏】【着】【柔】【情】,【也】【藏】【着】【试】【探】。【她】【抿】【着】【唇】,【回】【答】【他】【说】:“【奴】【婢】【苏】【红】……【啊】……”【惊】【呼】【中】,【对】【方】【又】【是】【把】【自】【己】【拉】【着】【胳】【膊】,【再】【一】【次】,【苏】【红】【本】【能】【地】【向】【前】【一】【扑】。【一】【抬】【头】,【就】【可】【以】【触】【及】【到】【他】【深】【沉】【的】【眸】【子】。 “【你】【还】【是】【不】【说】【吗】?”【翟】【天】

【当】【陈】【二】【满】【心】【欢】【喜】【送】【走】【最】【后】【一】【批】【地】【主】【流】【民】【后】,【背】【着】【自】【己】【的】【小】【书】【包】,【准】【备】【叫】【上】【自】【己】【另】【外】【几】【个】【小】【伙】【伴】【回】【家】【吃】【肉】【的】【时】【候】,【转】【头】【又】【看】【见】【了】【一】【尊】【大】【佛】【从】【一】【辆】【低】【调】【的】【牛】【车】【上】【下】【来】。 【顾】【随】【意】【从】【车】【上】【跳】【下】【来】,【目】【睹】【了】【陈】【二】【面】【部】【表】【情】【的】【变】【化】:“【怎】【么】?【不】【欢】【迎】【我】?” “【怎】【么】【会】~【殿】【下】【想】【多】【了】。”【陈】【二】【卖】【笑】【道】。 “【这】【儿】【人】【都】【走】【的】【差】【不】

  【薛】【莲】【走】【在】【前】【面】,【听】【见】【后】【面】【阿】【回】【担】【忧】,【转】【头】【答】【道】:“【放】【心】【吧】,【你】【瞧】【他】【身】【上】【挂】【着】【什】【么】?”【手】【里】【指】【向】【孤】【青】【腰】【间】【挂】【着】【的】【玉】【佩】,【那】【不】【是】【之】【前】【孤】【青】【在】【百】【明】【客】【栈】【为】【昭】【明】【他】【们】【开】【客】【房】【的】【时】【候】【出】【示】【的】【东】【西】【嘛】。 【平】【日】【里】【倒】【是】【从】【来】【没】【见】【过】【孤】【青】【带】【这】【些】【配】【饰】【东】【西】,【今】【天】【怎】【么】【淘】【出】【来】【带】【上】【了】,【阿】【回】【投】【去】【疑】【惑】【的】【目】【光】,【薛】【莲】【落】【后】【半】【步】,【小】【声】【在】【阿】【回】【耳】2017马报彩图资料【再】【次】【看】【到】【世】【界】【级】【别】【挑】【战】【赛】【的】【新】【闻】,【无】【疑】【挑】【起】【了】【胡】【晓】【峰】【的】【争】【斗】【之】【心】,【但】【毕】【竟】【还】【是】【遥】【远】【的】【事】,【饭】【要】【一】【口】【口】【地】【吃】。 【给】【新】【收】【的】【男】【频】【书】【都】【提】【了】【修】【改】【建】【议】【后】,【胡】【晓】【峰】【又】【为】【准】【备】【上】【线】【的】【新】【功】【能】【写】【了】【几】【百】【行】【代】【码】,【感】【觉】【时】【间】【很】【不】【够】【用】【的】【样】【子】。 【越】【是】【紧】【张】【的】【时】【候】,【越】【需】【要】【调】【节】【一】【下】【心】【情】,【下】【午】【四】【点】【多】,【胡】【晓】【峰】【提】【前】【下】【班】,【去】【县】【剧】【场】【看】

  【这】【个】【公】【国】【偏】【远】【小】【镇】【的】【冬】【夜】【格】【外】【得】【明】【朗】。 【抬】【头】【就】【能】【看】【见】【漫】【天】【的】【繁】【星】【清】【晰】【地】【在】【头】【顶】【闪】【耀】,【似】【乎】【伸】【手】【就】【能】【碰】【到】。 【有】【三】【个】【人】【影】【摇】【摇】【晃】【晃】【地】【走】【在】【起】【伏】【的】【山】【坡】【上】,【看】【他】【们】【的】【方】【向】【正】【是】【前】【往】【此】【刻】【灯】【火】【通】【明】【的】【小】【镇】。 【这】【三】【人】【自】【然】【就】【是】【安】【娜】、【巴】【斯】【特】【的】【和】【卡】【洛】【琳】。 【安】【娜】【走】【在】【前】【头】,【她】【后】【面】【紧】【紧】【跟】【着】【的】【是】【巴】【斯】【特】,【原】【本】【这】【小】【家】

  【东】【海】【之】【上】,【一】【群】【选】【手】【踩】【着】【赛】【道】【追】【逐】。 【天】【渺】【踏】【着】【祥】【云】,【带】【着】【一】【队】【仙】【女】【们】【进】【行】【直】【播】。 “【现】【在】【领】【先】【的】【是】【巫】【门】【夸】【父】。【他】【使】【用】【昆】【仑】【山】【秘】【传】【的】‘【逐】【日】【追】【光】【步】’,【身】【如】【虹】【光】,【踏】【浪】【而】【行】。【在】【他】【身】【后】【是】【妖】【神】【毕】【方】,【这】【位】【妖】【神】【显】【化】【本】【体】,【化】【作】【流】【火】【紧】【紧】【咬】【住】【前】【面】【的】【大】【巫】【夸】【父】。” “【而】【自】【毕】【方】【之】【后】【的】【前】【十】【名】,【都】【是】【飞】【行】【类】【的】【妖】【神】【以】

  【工】【作】【区】【的】【占】【地】【面】【积】【很】【广】,【主】【体】【架】【构】【是】【一】【个】【大】【的】【惊】【人】【广】【场】【及】【广】【场】【边】【缘】【一】【扇】【扇】【标】【记】【着】【仓】【库】【字】【样】【的】【大】【门】,【然】【而】【此】【时】【在】【叶】【凡】【等】【人】【的】【眼】【中】【整】【个】【工】【作】【区】【仿】【佛】【遭】【受】【过】【洗】【劫】【一】【般】。【广】【场】【上】【到】【处】【都】【是】【拆】【卸】【留】【下】【的】【坑】【洞】【和】【焊】【接】【口】,【线】【路】【和】【机】【械】【零】【件】【到】【处】【都】【是】,【仓】【库】【的】【大】【门】【全】【部】【敞】【开】,【一】【眼】【望】【过】【去】【空】【空】【如】【也】,【再】【仔】【细】【看】,【广】【场】【地】【面】【上】【留】【下】【的】【的】【机】【械】




(责任编辑:史君丽)

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